Bamitbach

Sharing Food and Memories with Friends and Family

March 23, 2012
Irene Saiger

5 comments

Marisha’s Veal Roast

It is an unfortunate truth that extended family members may only get together for life cycle events, both happy and sad.  Two weeks ago many members of the Graf family came to Philadelphia, and as a result I was able to spend time with my Tante Marisha.  Marisha is now the matriarch of the family, the only person still alive of my father’s generation, and she looks great.   She and my Uncle Charlie met in Poland during the war, moved to France after the war, and then eventually settled in Lakewood, New Jersey, where I spent much of my childhood visiting them and my cousins.  I reminded my aunt that she use to call me “princess” and she reminded me that she would take me to the “market’  to help her sell hats.

Marisha arrived in Philadelphia with her sons, daughters-in-law, her eldest grandson and his wife.  Both my cousin Michel and I named our middle children David, after our fathers’ brother who died during the war.  I watched these two Davids, second cousins, both grown men, both married, both serious and both learned, talking to each other, and I was filled with a sense of continuity.  Wherever I looked, cousins were conversing and getting to know each other.  There was talk of cars, horses, gardening, art and architecture, and I was feeling strangely content despite the overwhelming sadness of the occasion.  I realize that it may be years before all the cousins get together again, and hopefully next time it will be for a happy event, but I was sure that the three brothers, Jack, Charley and Harry knew we were there, together, under one roof, for a brief time.

At one point my daughter and I were sitting with Tante Marisha when the conversation turned to food.  My aunt told us that her grandchildrens’ favorite dish is veal roast, and related that she prepares it in the same way she and my mother prepared chicken and turkey, coated with a simple mixture of minced garlic, salt and pepper, and baked till golden and tender.  I couldn’t wait to come home and make it, knowing that I would feel as if I had a bit of Marisha with me, but also wanting to preserve another recipe, and another memory, for another generation.
Marisha’s Veal Roast
8 lb Veal Roast, bones left in
10 cloves of garlic, minced
1 Tb salt
1 Tb cracked pepper
1 Tb paprika
3 Tb olive oil
Make a paste of all the ingredients and rub into veal.  Place veal in roasting pan that fits snugly, cover well and refrigerate overnight.  Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees, add enough water to just come up to the bottom of the veal, cover tightly and bake for about 3 hours, basting after each hour.  Add water if needed.  Uncover for last hour to brown.  Serves 8
Enjoy,
Irene
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5 thoughts on “Marisha’s Veal Roast

  1. Our Pesach family used to make veal roasts as well but now everyone is watching their costs. We still have the same potato kugel and dessert every year though. As my husband says, the potatoes/eggs in salt water don’t taste the same if you eat them at any other time.
    I loved the story. We emigrated to North America and don’t have much family nearby so got adopted by a family who also had a kid in my son’s daycare. We’ve now had seders together for over 20 years.

  2. When in your lifetime has a group of jews gotten together regardless of the reason and the conversation hasn’t been food. I think it is just wonderful that family ,friends
    and food go together…….Amaziing that the David’s are alike yet individuals. wonderful and the men are for sure looking down with pride that they have passed on such warm and wonderful traditions.

    • Hi Denise,

      Fortunately for you, your family is often together and so maybe I notice it more since it is so rare. Thank you so much for commenting. I always appreciate it!!!!

      Irene

  3. Warm and fond memories and delicious food are fabulous ways to start Shabbat. Thanks so much for sharing them with us

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