Teriyaki Chicken

Photo taken by Micah

Photo taken by Micah

Years ago I was in Israel during Passover, and at the end of the chag  I was visiting my sister-in-law Fern in Bet Shemesh. On the last evening, after the chag was over, she took us to her neighbor’s home where I experienced my first Mimouna, a celebration that Moroccan Jews have at the end of the holiday.  Apparently it is a kind of open house, no invitations required, allowing friends and family to join together and break the week-long prohibition against leavened bread.  Sound familiar?  We do something very similar at the end of Yom Kippur,  but unfortunately we end Passover in a very different way.  We typically rush out for pizza or pasta or any carb laden meal, all of which is very unsatisfying.   What a sad way to say goodbye to a holiday that we have devoted so much time to,  and then leave so eagerly.   I loved being at that Mimouna,  just like I love going to our friend Fredda to break the fast after Yom Kippur.  There is a lot to be said for after-parties, everyone is relaxed and is anybody really ready to say goodbye?

I propose that we adopt a similar ritual to Mimouna, but instead of Moroccan sweets and mufleta, (a flat bread served warm with honey) we end Passover with a post-chag BBQ.  Corn, hot dogs, hamburgers, fresh buns, and my new favorite, Teriyaki Chicken.  Any takers?

Teriyaki Chicken

2-3 pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs ( i do not recommend breasts)

Marinade

1/2 cup mirin

1/2 cup soy sauce

One 2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated

Combine mirin, soy sauce, and ginger in a large freezer bag.  Add the chicken thighs, force the air from the bag and seal.  Make sure the marinade covers all the chicken and refrigerate for at least 8 hours, flipping it over a few times so both sides get marinated.   Drain the chicken and reserve marinade in a small pan.  Bring marinade to a boil, reduce heat, and cook for a few minutes.

Grill chicken over a high heat, or pan fry (put a tablespoon or two of canola oil in the pan and heat) in a cast-iron skillet, for about 3 minutes on each side, then cover, lower grill or flame, and cook for about 15 minutes total.  Brush with marinade as needed.  Do NOT overcook!   Slice in 2 inch strips.   Serves 4-6.

Note: I served this plain, but they would be delicious in a brown rice bowl with steamed veggies, or in a sandwich!  Reduce soy sauce if you prefer less salt, or add sugar if you like a sweeter teriyaki.

Enjoy,

Irene

 

Gingerbread Cake

When we were growing up, it seemed that someone was always dropping in to visit with my mother.  They would sit at the kitchen table and talk, usually over a cup of coffee.  My mom’s closest friend, Fanny, would nibble on a spoonful of  jam instead of  a cookie.  Our lifestyle is not really conducive to dropping in on friends in such a casual way,  and so I was thrilled when my friend Lori came by last Sunday afternoon with a warm cake,  just out of the oven, and a book that she knew I would love.  We sat and chatted, and I was reminded of what we have lost in the shuffle of our busy schedules.  I miss dropping in on friends and I miss having friends drop in on us, but the sad part of the story occurred to me afterwards,  and that was that I never even offered her a cup of coffee.

Lori sent me the recipe along with a little explanation.

The recipe is called “Gingerybread” and is adapted (by me) from a lovely little breakfast/brunch cookbook from the Grant Corner Inn, a bed and breakfast located in a 106 year old Victorian house in Sante Fe, New Mexico.  It makes a large 10 x 14 inch cake that can easily serve more than 12 people.
Gingerybread
1 cup butter
1/4 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 cup dark molasses
1 cup honey
1 tsp vanilla
2 TBSP strong coffee
1 3/4 boiling water
4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 3/4 tsp soda
1 tsp salt
2 tsp ground ginger
2 tsp cinnamon
1/3 cup chopped candied ginger
Preheat oven to 325 and grease a 10 x 14 inch baking pan.
Cream shortening and sugar until fluffy.  Blend in eggs, coffee, vanilla, molasses and honey.  Stir in boiling water and set aside.
In a medium bowl sift together dry ingredients and then mix into liquids, blending well.
Fold in candied ginger. Bake at 325 for about 45 minutes or till top springs back when touched.
PS – The cookbook states that this recipe is similar to the way gingerbread is made in Scotland – dark and substantial.  My adaption was to omit the zest of an orange and substitute vanilla and coffee for 2 TBSP of brandy.
Note: This cake would be perfect for the holidays as an alternative to honey cake.  Lori halved the recipe without a problem and is experimenting with oil to make a pareve version.
Enjoy,
Irene

Imberlach

This is a Saiger family recipe for a Passover confection called Imberlach.  The recipe was handed down to my mother-in-law from her mother-in-law, Manya Saiger, my children’s great-grandmother.  My mother-in-law once described Imberlach for a Passover cookbook “watch your cavities or fillings, the imberlach are jawbreakers, but oh so good.”

Imberlach
1 1/2 lbs. honey
1/2 cup sugar
2/3 lb. matzoh farfel
1 Tbs. fresh ginger, grated
1 cup chopped walnuts

Bring honey and sugar to a boil, lower heat and cook for five minutes, stirring constantly.  Add farfel slowly and cook an additional five minutes.  Make sure there is still a little liquid in the bottom of the pot.  Add ginger and walnuts and stir for ten minutes until mixture is brown.  Wet a wooden board with cold water and pour mixture on, carefully spreading with a wet knife. Allow to set for several hours and cut to form diamond shapes. Candy is sticky.

Enjoy,
Irene