Etty’s Chocolate Meringue Cookies (Guest Post)

It wasn’t Passover in our house until we had eaten my mother’s Chocolate Meringue cookies. When I was young we lived in Pittsburg California.  There were only a handful of Jewish families, and the local market didn’t have Passover foods, so my mother came up with this recipe.   I remember after Purim, my mom would drive into San Francisco and do what she called her  “major Passover shopping”.   She would buy the canned macaroons, but they didn’t compare to her special cookies.  Of course in our family, if it wasn’t chocolate it wasn’t dessert.   (What would we do if we couldn’t eat chocolate on Passover?)  Perish the thought!!

Etty’s Chocolate Meringue Cookies

3 egg whites at room temperature
1/2 c sugar
6 oz melted semi sweet chocolate
2/3 chopped walnuts, or any chopped nut of your choice
(almonds are delicious, as are pecans)

Whip the egg whites until they just start to shape into peaks and slowly add the sugar.  Beat until whites are stiff and then gently fold in the melted chocolate and the nuts.  Chocolate and nuts should be well incorporated into the egg white mixture.  Drop by teaspoons onto a cookie sheet that is covered with parchment paper.

Bake at 325 for 10 minutes and then turn the oven off and let them sit in the oven either overnight or for 4-6 hours.  At this point they can be frozen and keep beautifully until served.   Jessica Sacher

Brownie Meringues

We are now three weeks away from Passover.  This is the first time in about twenty years that we will be conducting the Seder in the dining room primarily because twelve of us can fit there.  No need to empty out the living room, order extra tables, rent cloths and napkins.  Yet instead of being happy about shedding all of the planning and angst that can accompany preparing for a large Seder, why are my thoughts drawn to Seders past with longing and nostalgia and to future Seders with something akin to dread.  It has been a difficult year.  My 92-year-old father passed away in September and for the first time, he will not be present at our Seder. Growing up in NYC, Seders were pretty traditional affairs; my father and the other men would stand and chant the Haggadah in unison, with no one else participating.  The wives read along silently and the children wiggled and giggled and waited for dinner.  It was not egalitarian or engaging or educational and yet I have warm and happy memories.  The table was beautifully set, the fine china was brought out, wonderful aromas came from the kitchen, new clothing was purchased, cousins got together and my father and the other men argued about politics all through the meal. Pesach was special. Continue reading