Bubelach (Passover Pancakes)

As a young girl I always thought that “bubela” was a term of endearment.  I am not sure how old I was when I found out that it was also a pancake.  This is a recipe that my Mom made every Passover.  Our friends, the Androns, lived across the alley from my parents and when their kids would run over to visit, my Mom would serve them bubelach.  We always ate it with sugar on top and a cup of hot tea but it is equally good with jam or a fresh fruit topping.

Bubelach
4 eggs, separated
5 Tbsp. matzoh meal
dash salt
3-4 Tbsp. oil

Beat egg whites till stiff. Gently fold in yolks, matzoh meal and salt. Heat oil in large, deep, frying pan till hot. Gently pour mixture into pan and lower heat. When bottom of pancake is golden, slide carefully on to a plate, and invert back into pan. Cook for about five more minutes. Insert a toothpick to make sure center is dry. Cut and serve hot. Serves 2-3

Enjoy,
Irene

Persian Charoset

For the next fourteen days I will be devoting my post to one Passover recipe a day.  Who has time for stories?  Hope you try them and enjoy them.

This recipe for Persian Charoset was given to me by a friend many years ago.  One of the wonderful culinary influences in Los Angeles is that of the large Persian community.  Compared to the benign Ashkenazi Charoset of my childhood, this is full of flavor and texture.

An interior decorator, my friend would shape the Charoset into a Pyramid. We now add a small olive wood camel to the presentation.

Persian Charoset
1/2 cup pistachios
1/2 cup blanched almonds
1/2 cup walnuts
1 cup pitted dates
1/2 cup hazelnuts
1/2 cup dark raisins
1/2 cup yellow raisins
1 large apple, peeled
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 orange, diced
3/4 cup sweet red wine
1 tsp. cinnamon

Coarsely chop nuts, raisins and fruit in food processor. Combine all ingredients and blend well.

Enjoy,
Irene

Brownie Meringues

We are now three weeks away from Passover.  This is the first time in about twenty years that we will be conducting the Seder in the dining room primarily because twelve of us can fit there.  No need to empty out the living room, order extra tables, rent cloths and napkins.  Yet instead of being happy about shedding all of the planning and angst that can accompany preparing for a large Seder, why are my thoughts drawn to Seders past with longing and nostalgia and to future Seders with something akin to dread.  It has been a difficult year.  My 92-year-old father passed away in September and for the first time, he will not be present at our Seder. Growing up in NYC, Seders were pretty traditional affairs; my father and the other men would stand and chant the Haggadah in unison, with no one else participating.  The wives read along silently and the children wiggled and giggled and waited for dinner.  It was not egalitarian or engaging or educational and yet I have warm and happy memories.  The table was beautifully set, the fine china was brought out, wonderful aromas came from the kitchen, new clothing was purchased, cousins got together and my father and the other men argued about politics all through the meal. Pesach was special. Continue reading