Bamitbach

Sharing Food and Memories with Friends and Family

first

October 22, 2014
Irene Saiger

4 comments

French Split Pea Soup

photo-7There aren’t many foods that are more comforting than a simple bowl of soup.  It may not elicit the same oohs and aahs that taking a bite of perfectly cooked steak can, or cause you to close your eyes as you might when eating a decadent piece of molten chocolate cake, but unlike its flashier counterparts, it rarely disappoints.  Without much effort, soup is nourishing, warming, and filling.

We just returned from New York where we spent Sukkot,  and during our visit we made soup three times.  The first night of Yontif, we had a Carrot and Pear Bisque, the pear was a great addition to offset the strong flavor of curry.  Later in the week, we made Tortilla Soup, a family and Southern California favorite.  Finally, during the last days of Yontif, a large number of unused onions called for French Onion Soup, a rich and delicious broth that included wine and sherry, topped with Gruyère and was served with a fresh baguette.

During Chol Hamoed we took a trip to Philadelphia to visit my cousin Micheline.  We spent a good part of the day at the National Museum of American Jewish History, but despite the lateness of the hour, when we returned to Micheline’s home we were served a full meal.  It included a split pea soup that was so silky and full of flavor that I was sure it had some secret ingredient.  The recipe was from an old French cookbook that she owned, and as she read it to me, I was surprised at how simple and how few ingredients there actually were.

My youngest son’s girlfriend Anna has an expression that she uses every time we share a meal together.  She exclaims that she is “soooooooo full.”   Her Mom had a lovely interpretation of the expression, saying her daughter is full in the best sense, happy and content.   That’s how I  felt after our trip, and that’s how I felt tonight, after making this soup at the end of a long day.  Happy after I finished the first bowl, and content after I finished the second.

 

Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,
Waiting in a hot tureen!
Who for such dainties would not stoop?
Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!
Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!
Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup!

“Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,
Game, or any other dish?
Who would not give all else for two
Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?
Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!
Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!
Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,
Beautiful, beauti—FUL SOUP!”
-from Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

 French Split Pea Soup

1 pound bag of split peas, rinsed

10 cups water

2 Tb olive oil (or butter if you want to make a dairy version)

1 sprig parsley

2 sprigs thyme

2 bay leaves

1 medium onion

2 carrots

2 stalks celery

dash of baking soda

2 1/2 tsp salt

Place split peas in a large pot, cover with water and bring to a boil.  Allow to cook for a few minutes and then drain and wash pot.  Dice carrots, onion and celery and add mirepoix to clean pot along with olive oil or butter.  Saute for several minutes but do not brown.   Add peas, water, salt and cheesecloth containing parsley, thyme and bay leaves.  Add a pinch of baking soda.  Allow to cook, uncovered on a low heat, for about 45 minutes depending or till peas are very tender.  Remove herbs. Puree and serve warm.   If dairy, add a dollop of creme fraiche. Serves 6-8.

Enjoy,

Irene

 

September 19, 2014
Irene Saiger

6 comments

Chicken Soup for a Crowd

photo-7Recently my sister asked me if I ever think about our mother.  I was more than slightly surprised by the question, but Anita explained that I don’t often bring her up in our conversations.  She’s right, I don’t speak of her very much, but still she is never far from my thoughts, especially around the holidays.  My mom did not have her own “signature scent,”  and although she owned one bottle of perfume, Joy, that she purchased before she left Paris in 1952, I don’t ever remember her using it.  She wasn’t one of those women who you associate with the scent of tuberose or jasmine.  Women who I pass on the street of a certain age don’t ever remind me of my mother because she didn’t share their love of hats, statement pieces of jewelry, or the latest fashion.  Mostly, I think about my Mom when I am in the kitchen, when the house is filled with the scent of cinnamon-laced cookies baking in the oven,  of onions frying on the stove-top, of chickens, smothered in garlic, roasting in the oven, or when a pot of chicken soup is simmering for hours at a time releasing that specific smell that announces its’ unmistakable presence.  Those were her signature smells,  and every day she wore a different scent.

Was my mother’s chicken soup unique?  Maybe not, but we loved it.  For us, chicken soup was everything my mother had to offer, concentrated in a bowl.  A dish that was simultaneously nurturing, warm, inviting, and filling.  So Anita, yes, I think about Mom, and right now, while a pot of chicken soup is simmering on the stove, the house smells like her too.

This morning my daughter mentioned that my chicken soup recipe was not on the blog.  There are hundreds of chicken soup recipes but she wanted mine and so here it is.  It is based on my mother’s, but has changed over the years.  This one is large enough to serve a crowd for Rosh Hashana.  In our home we serve kreplach on Rosh Hashana and Matzoh Balls  on Passover.

photo-7

Chicken Soup 

12 pieces of chicken, all thighs or a combination of thighs and breasts

2 cloves garlic, left whole

2 large brown onions, washed but not peeled, and left whole

1 large turnip

4 small parsnips

6 stalks celery, leaves left on, cut in half

2 medium zucchini left whole

2 Roma tomatoes, left whole

2 leeks, white and pale green part only, washed thoroughly, and cut in half lengthwise

2 large carrots, cut in large chunks

1 large bunch Italian parsley

1 Tb kosher salt

freshly ground pepper to taste

20 cups of water or enough to cover

Osem chicken bouillon if needed, about 1 Tb.

Place everything in very large soup pot (this recipes is 5 quarts of water without veggies) or divide into two pots.  Bring to a boil, remove scum from the top, reduce to the point where bubbles are breaking the surface, but nothing brisker than that.   Allow to simmer for about 3 hours.  Drain vegetables and chicken and serve golden broth with kreplach or matzoh balls.  Serves 15-20.   NOTE: Some chickens are less flavorful than others and so sometimes I need to add some chicken bouillon at the end but use sparingly because it clouds the broth.

Enjoy,

Irene

 

 

 

 

September 12, 2014
Irene Saiger

2 comments

Moroccan Fish Balls (Boulettes De Poisson)

photo-4My daughter Shira and one of her oldest and closest friends Alex, have been traveling through Morocco for the past two weeks.  Shira has sent  detailed e-mails about their adventures, and this one was perfect to share just before Shabbat.  As we begin planning our Rosh Hashana menus, I love the idea of having something “new” on our table, and thought you might too.  Shabbat Shalom.

From Shira…

On Friday, once back at our riad in Marrakech, we relaxed for a bit before heading to Shul around 7:30. We went to the synagogue in the Gueliz area (the new part of town) — there is another older Shul in the medina as well. The crowd was sparse, with no more than 11 or 12 men. We were the only women, and were sitting behind a curtained area. I’m not the biggest Shul-goer but it was really interesting to hear some of the Moroccan tunes for Kabbalat Shabbat, and see the different prayer style — the congregants, who were sitting throughout the room, would take turns singing the verses of the prayers. The men appeared to be arguing a bit here and there about whose turn it would be to go next, and spoke in Arabic among themselves, which I found interesting as well.

After services, we walked with Monsieur Ohayon​ ​(our host for Shabbat dinner) to his apartment, where we had dinner with him, his wife Bloria​ (​who did all the cooking​)​ and their youngest daughter, Shirel.​ ​The table was huge, and when we sat down it was already laid out with a large variety of ​vegetable ​salads and fish.​ Carrots, beets, eggplant, potato ​salad ​with eggs and​ ​cornichon, olives and taktouka (tomatoes and peppers). There were three kinds of fish ​as well ​– small whole river fish​ with many bones​, fish steaks that looked like salmon but were whit​e-f​​​leshed and ​fish patties​ that had a slightly yellow hue​. ​I​ tried them all but liked the fish patties the best.

Then came the main course​: ​chicken on the bone​, sliced beef, and of course ​couscous with a variety of vegetables, prunes and chickpeas. The food was ​delicious​ and it was fun to be able to try so many different things. ​For dessert we had grapes, plums and nectarines. We spoke in a mix of Hebrew and French and it was interesting to learn about the Jewish experience in Morocco (their families have been living there for as long as they know), how life has changed over the years, and that the once flourishing Jewish community of Marrakesh numbered ​at ​32,000 and has diminished to a community of 120. Monsieur Ohayon runs a store in the mellah (the old jewish area of the medina, where he and his wife also grew up), selling raw materials to artisans. They aspire to move to Israel one day once their children are all grown up and taken care of.​ But as my traveling companion, Alex, pointed out to them, who will host the Jewish travelers of Marrakech for Shabbat dinner if they are no longer there?

photo-5

Fish Balls   (adapted from one of my favorite cookbooks) Sephardic Cooking by Copeland Marks

1 pound boneless and skinless fish fillets

1 small onion, sliced

3 garlic cloves, sliced

1 handful each of  fresh cilantro and parsley  (about 1/2 cup each)

1 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

1/2  tsp paprika

2 eggs, beaten

2 Tb flour

Vegetable oil for frying pan

photo-6

Either hand chop or process all ingredients, except eggs and flour, till you have a smooth paste.  Put mixture in mixing bowl and add beaten eggs and flour.  Mix well.  Pour enough oil into large frying pan till it is about 1/2″ deep.  Prepare round small balls and fry over medium heat for about 5 or 6 minutes per side.  This made about 12 fish balls.  6 servings.

Enjoy,

Irene

August 31, 2014
Irene Saiger

6 comments

Lemony Zucchini Ribbons

photo-2With the New Year approaching, it was time to spruce up my blog with a “new” look.  A BIG thank you to my son Micah who made it happen.  Hope you like it!!

Several weeks ago my daughter was visiting when she wanted to make a salad that she had eaten at the home of family friends in the South of France.  I was very skeptical when she described it to me, but the results were surprisingly delicious.  My doubts were based on my inability to imagine that zucchini could actually be transformed with just a touch of salt, lemon and olive oil.   I made the salad again this morning and fed it to my son’s girlfriend Anna, who looked at it with the same skepticism that I had initially felt.  After one bite and an “oh my g-d,” she asked for more.  You will too!

 

 

Lemony Zucchini Ribbons

4 small zucchini

1 Tb good quality extra-virgin olive oil

juice of one small lemon

1/2 tsp salt

freshly ground pepper

shaved parmesan cheese

 

photo-2

Using a wide bladed peeler, discard first peel of zucchini.  Then with not too much pressure applied ( so you can thin ribbons) continue to peel zucchini into ribbons.  Toss in a bowl with remaining ingredients and serve with shaved parmesan.  Serves 4 as a side dish.

Enjoy,

Irene

 

August 17, 2014
Irene Saiger

13 comments

Cinnamon Buns

photo-2Last week I dreamt about my Mom for the very first time since she passed away over a decade ago.  In my dream I was laying in bed and she was sitting on the edge looking down on me, reassuring me that “everything was going to be alright,” an expression that I don’t remember her using when she was alive.  The whole dream was unsettling, but I decided that her message was worth holding on to, and so during this particularly stressful summer, I have tried making an effort to weave some childlike innocence back into my life, at least during August, my birthday month.  It’s easy to remember what it was like when world news could not be farther from my thoughts and the biggest worry I had on any given day in August was deciding which flavor I would pick from the Italian ice cart as it made its way down the Grand Concourse on those hot summer days in the Bronx.

So what have I done this summer?  We had lunch at the original Farmers’ Market which consisted of a delicious grilled cheese sandwich at Short Cake, with a tall glass of iced blueberry lemonade (blueberries were a very important part of my childhood summers).  We saw How to Train a Dragon 2, during which I treated myself to a childhood favorite, Malted Milk Balls.  Last Sunday was spent at the beach with Shira and Norm, and enjoyed the feeling that with each set of receding waves, another set of worries were being washed away.  Shira and I spent an afternoon at a Korean Spa, (o.k. that is not from my childhood) an experience so relaxing that I fell asleep while having a spa treatment.  And then today.  Today is my actual birthday and so after my daughter-in-law arrived in town we went to Joan’s  On Third for breakfast, definitely a favorite of mine, and I ate two soft-boiled eggs, something my mother often made for me and always served in shot glasses.  Joan’s makes them just the way I like them, 4 minutes, not 3 which produces a runny white, and not 5 which makes the yolk too hard.  It has to be four, four is  the perfect number to achieve the right balance between too soft and too firm.  We then drove over  to the Hollywood Farmer’s Market, came home, ate fresh (peaches and cream) corn, brushed with melted butter and a sprinkling of sea salt.  Elizabeth and I, her close friend Rachel and baby Orly, retreated to the den and Norm “put up” some pickles, and baked a batch of cinnamon buns for dessert.  They should be ready in a few minutes and I expect that when I bite into that rich yeast dough, and all I smell is that quintessential childhood combination of sugar and cinnamon, that I will remember my dream, and the words of my mother, and I too will be sure that everything will be alright.

photo-2

Cinnamon Buns

1) Make a half recipe of your favorite Challah dough, using about  3 1/2 – 4 cups flour.   (Click on the link for my recipe)

2) Mix dough and allow to rise at room temperature till double in bulk.  While dough is rising, make sugar and cinnamon combination.

3) Combine 3/4 cup brown sugar or a combination of brown and white sugars with 3 Tb good quality ground cinnamon. Whisk together till smooth, and lump free.

4) Sprinkle counter with flour, punch down dough,  and roll out to a large rectangle, till thickness is about 1/4 inch.

5) Melt 2 Tb butter and using a pastry brush, paint surface of dough.

6) Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar combination leaving a 1/4 inch border around the perimeter of the dough.

7) Roll dough into a tight log, starting with the long side.  Slice into 16 equal portions.

8) Grease a 9″ square pan and place buns, spiral side up, snugly into pan.

9) Allow to rise for about 2 hours.

10) Preheat oven and bake at 350 for about 20-25 minutes, rotating after 1o minutes, till rich golden brown.

Make a fondant or cream cheese glaze of your choice.

Serve slightly warm.

Enjoy,

Irene

July 15, 2014
Irene Saiger

13 comments

Oven-Roasted Herb Tomatoes

photo-2 copy 2It was the summer of 1972,  I was 16 years old and I was going to Israel for the first time. The trip was organized by Hadassah, six weeks long, we were to spend a week on kibbutz, a week on Gadna (pre-army training camp) at Sde Boker, and the remaining month touring.  After we arrived, we drove to Jerusalem and were taken to our residence, Beit Riklis on Mt Scopus.  There was a brief orientation after which we were sent to our rooms and told ” lights out.”   But we were 16 year olds, naïve and foolish, and it didn’t take long before we decided to sneak out.  We began walking down the road  but our adventure soon ended when a Volkswagen pulled over and the driver, a middle-aged man, asked who we were, what we were doing, and where we were going.  He yelled at us, and made us pile into the car so he could return us to the safety of the dorm.  That was the first, but not the last, time that we got into trouble that summer, a summer filled with adventure and new experiences, exactly as it should have been. Of course, I remember the food as well, my first taste of Falafel, of ice-cold Choco, of perfectly diced Israeli salads made with ripe red tomatoes and crunchy cucumbers, the centerpiece of those incredibly lavish Israeli breakfasts (my normal breakfast of Frosted Flakes and milk was no match). For weeks now, Israel is never far from our thoughts.  We worry, listen to the news on an hourly basis, and check in with family and friends who live there.  I spend time reminiscing, thinking about that summer, and the year that I later spent on Kibbutz Usha.  I think about how lucky I was to have those experiences, as were my husband and children during the time they spent in Israel.  I think about how different this summer is, and hope that very soon, Israeli teenagers will once again be living in peace, and American teenagers will once again be taking their first trips to Israel, getting into trouble, and having a summer filled with adventure and new experiences, exactly as it should be.

photo-2 copy 3

Sde Boker 1972

photo-2 copy photo-2 Oven-Roasted Herb Tomatoes When I spent time with our family friends on Kfar Meishar, a Moshav outside of Gedera,  I was always amazed at how quickly delicious salads would appear on the table, with what appeared to be little effort.  With a surplus of tomatoes in the garden,  many of which I used for Israeli salad, I decided to roast some.  I sliced them, placed them in a glass dish (avoid using metal that could react with the tomatoes) sprinkled them with a small handful of chopped herbs, also from the garden ( I used sage, oregano, rosemary and tarragon),  added 6 cloves of garlic, thinly sliced, a little sea salt and  drizzled Israeli olive oil over the top. They were a great addition to a breakfast of fried eggs, feta cheese and olives. Bake at 325 for about 1 1/2 hours. Enjoy, Irene

June 27, 2014
Irene Saiger

8 comments

Pan- Fried Trout

photo-2The family vacations we took with my parents were typically to parks in California.  Sequoia, Yosemite, Mammoth, Big Sur, Lake Tahoe.  They were simple vacations, all within driving distance.  There were eight of us, and we usually stayed in cabins inside the parks, ate in the park concessions, and spent our days hiking or going on ranger walks.

We just returned from a family trip to Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks, and though my parents are no longer alive, I thought of them often during this particular trip.  I knew how much my father would have enjoyed the wildlife, and I was sure that my excitement at seeing bison and bears would have paled in comparison to what his reaction might have been.  I thought of my mother and knew how much she would have loved being with us, to have had the opportunity to see her grandchildren all grown up,  and get to know her granddaughter-in-law.  I knew that they would have “kvelled” when their youngest grandson broke the family record of never having caught a fish, by catching a beautiful trout in Lake Yellowstone.  I was grateful for the memories I had of watching my mother prepare fish, so when I found myself suddenly faced with the task, I was able to stun, kill, gut, and scale the trout as my husband and kids looked on.  An hour later the trout was  presented to us on platters, graciously prepared by the chef at Lake Lodge.

We’ve been home for a week, but I am still thinking of our trip, and especially Yellowstone.  Instead of our typical Shabbat dinner, tonight we are having fish.  Trout, of course.

As one of the guides said to me, “Americans are always going somewhere else, but there is plenty of beauty in our own backyard.”  Amen and Happy 4th of July.  Shabbat Shalom.

Pan-Fried Trout 

The chef at Lake Lodge told me  she soaked the trout in milk for a few minutes, then lightly dredged it in flour, and seasoned to taste.  The only thing I changed is that I added some cornmeal to the flour mixture for extra crunch, and pan-fried the trout in my cast iron pan.

1  3-4 pound trout, boned and cut into fillets

1/2 cup milk

1/4 cup flour and equal amount of cornmeal

1/2 tsp salt and pepper to taste

1 tsp paprika

3 Tb butter

1 Tb olive oil

Soak trout in milk to cover for about 15 minutes. Drain and pat dry.  Combine flour and cornmeal and add seasonings.  Lightly dredge trout, then shake off excess coating.  Put butter in a cast iron pan along with olive oil.  Melt butter and place fillets in hot pan, skin side up, for about 5 minutes, depending on size.  Turn over and cook an extra five minutes, adding more butter if necessary.  Serve with lemon wedges, fresh corn and a cold beer.

Enjoy,

Irene

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 454 other followers